advanced therapies international congress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISSCA will sponsor the 6th annual International Congress on Advanced Therapies in Medicine Nov. 24-25, 2018 in Riviera Nayarit.

MIAMI, July 27, 2018—For the third consecutive year the International Association for Stem Cell Application (ISSCA) will sponsor the International Congress on Advanced Therapies in Medicine 2018 on Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

The event will feature a commercial expo with 20 with 20 booths exhibiting new products and information for physicians in the field of regenerative medicine. More than 250 physicians are expected to be in attendance.

ISSCA will present information on its Fellowship in Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering program, a 6-day course during which a group of experienced academicians involved in stem cell transplantation present the general principles and practice of stem cell biology and evidence-based treatments to physicians looking to optimize the treatment options that benefit the health of their patients. The fellowship program will be held in Korea Oct. 22-27, 2018.

Fellowship participants will take part in a detailed program offering hands-on experience in stem cell applications and learn cell culture protocols including plating, trypsinization, harvesting, and cryopreservation, as well as an understanding and application of quality control tests including cell count, viability, flow cytometry, endotoxin, mycoplasma and sterility.

In addition, physicians participating in the ISSCA fellowship program will learn how to perform cGMP functions including cleanroom maintenance, gowning and environmental monitoring, while gaining insight on relevant applications of stem cell processing and regulations in a certified facility. ISSCA provides fellowship attendees with the tools necessary to implement regulatory and clinical guidelines when setting up a GMP facility, as well as copies of presentations, procedural protocols and all forms associated with a GMP facility provided.

Participating physicians learn to perform clinical procedures including lipoaspirate and bone marrow isolation, and reintroducing stem cells for various indications. Case books and full protocols for approximately 30 indications are also provided.

In addition, Global Stem Cells Group )GSCG) will present its stem cell processing center, a complete solution for providers to equip their practice facilities with an on-site regenerative medicine lab. Used for tissue processing, isolation, culturing and cryopreservation of stem cells, the stem cell processing center is designed to execute a state-of-the-art stem cell laboratory using the latest technology.

GSCG provides participating regenerative medicine teams with specialized training to implement high-level processes and therapies using the stem cell processing center for better clinical interpretation, better results while maintaining compliance with safety regulations and international standards.

GSCG’s stem cell laboratory solution represents a tremendous competitive advantage and differentiator that arms regenerative medicine practitioners with the ability to perform highly advanced stem cell procedures in their facilities.

The 2018 International Congress on Advanced Therapies in Medicine in Riviera Nayarit, Mexico will be held at the Hotel Krystal Grand in Nuevo Puerto Vallarta,

For more information and to register, email  info@stemcellsgroup.com, or call +1305 560 5337.

About ISSCA:

The International Society for Stem Cell Application (ISSCA) is a multidisciplinary community of scientists and physicians, all of whom aspire to treat diseases and lessen human suffering through advances in science, technology and the practice of regenerative medicine.

ISSCA serves its members through advancements made in the specialty of regenerative medicine.ISSCA’s vision is to take a leadership position in promoting excellence and setting standards in the regenerative medicine fields of publication, research, education, training, and certification.

As a medical specialty, regenerative medicine standards and certifications are essential, which is why ISSCA offers certification training in cities all over the world. The goal is to encourage more physicians to practice regenerative medicine and make it available to benefit patients both nationally and globally. Incorporated under the Republic of Korea as a non-profit entity, the ISSCA is focused on promoting excellence and standards in the field of regenerative medicine.

About Global Stem Cells Group:

Global Stem Cells Group (GSCG) is a worldwide network that combines seven major medical corporations. Each corporation is focused on furthering scientific and technological advancements in cutting-edge stem cell research, development, treatment, and training. The united efforts of GSCG’s affiliate companies provide medical practitioners with a one-stopepicenter for stem cell solutions that adhere to the highest medical standards.

Global stem cell’s mission is to be the largest recognized stem cell and regenerative medicine network in the world.

advanced therapies international congress

cell therapy fellowship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of its ongoing efforts to meet growing demand among physicians for continuing education opportunities in advanced cell therapies and tissue banking, the International Society for Stem Cell Application (ISSCA) will hold its next Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Fellowship program in Seoul, Korea October 22 – 27, 2018.

ISSCA’s fellowship training program offers physicians an opportunity to build knowledge and increase their therapeutic skills by learning to employ new developments in tissue banking practices and advanced cellular therapies to utilize in their practices.

The fellowship training will enable participating physicians to improve their core skills and competencies in regenerative medicine, establish optimal protocols, policies, and practices in tissue, cell, and advanced therapies, and ultimately enable them to deliver superior services to their patients.

Participating physicians will have the advantage of active engagement with world-class cellular and tissue banking experts in an immersive, hands-on experience while learning theoretical and analytic methods. Fellowship mentors are seasoned professionals devoted to creating new medical technologies and laboratory applications in one of the most rapidly-growing areas of biomedical engineering.

Cell therapy and tissue engineering offer tremendous potential for a career as a practitioner or researcher. Today’s students can be tomorrow’s pioneers in improving the efficacy of medical treatments and advancing the healthcare industry.

Engineering human tissues and organs can provide new treatments and cures for diseases, including blood vessels, bone, cartilage, liver, pancreas, peripheral nerves, and skin cells. Cell therapies and tissue engineering have the potential to revolutionize disease remediation and tissue repair in miraculous ways.

Fellowship participants will have complete access to ISSCA’s accredited stem cell advanced lab protocols. The ISSCA Fellowship program is a 6-day program that offers a certificate of completion issued by ISSCA and Westminster International University in Seoul. Students who complete the fellowship become members of the ISSCA’s international network of regenerative medical professionals and standard setters, with access to events, resources, training, and support moving forward.

ISSCA is the only organization that provides a complete cell therapy and tissue engineering fellowship focused on regenerative medicine. It is also the only fellowship of its kind supported by Korean Universities.

To learn more about the ISSCA fellowship and to reserve a spot at the October 2018 program in Korea, visit the Fellowship in Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering website, email info@stemcellsgroup.com, or call +1 813 510 9403

About ISSCA:

The International Society for Stem Cell Application (ISSCA) is a multidisciplinary community of scientists and physicians, all of whom aspire to treat diseases and lessen human suffering through advances in science, technology and the practice of regenerative medicine. ISSCA serves its members through advancements made in the specialty of regenerative medicine.

The ISSCA’s vision is to take a leadership position in promoting excellence and setting standards in the regenerative medicine fields of publication, research, education, training, and certification.

As a medical specialty, regenerative medicine standards and certifications are essential, which is why ISSCA offers certification training in cities all over the world. The goal is to encourage more physicians to practice regenerative medicine and make it available to benefit patients both nationally and globally. Incorporated under the Republic of Korea as a non-profit entity, the ISSCA is focused on promoting excellence and standards in the field of regenerative medicine.

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cell therapy fellowship

Although the clinical demand for bioengineered blood vessels continues to rise, current options for vascular conduits remain limited. The synergistic combination of emerging advances in tissue fabrication and stem cell engineering promises new strategies for engineering autologous blood vessels that recapitulate not only the mechanical properties of native vessels but also their biological function. Here we explore recent bioengineering advances in creating functional blood macro and microvessels, particularly featuring stem cells as a seed source. We also highlight progress in integrating engineered vascular tissues with the host after implantation as well as the exciting pre-clinical and clinical applications of this technology.

Ischemic diseases, such as atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), remain one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity across the world (GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators, 2016, Mozaffarian et al., 2016). These diseases have resulted in an ever-persistent demand for vascular conduits to reconstruct or bypass vascular occlusions and aneurysms. Synthetic grafts for replacing occluded arterial vessels were first introduced in the 1950s following surgical complications associated with harvesting vessels, the frequent shortage of allogeneic grafts, and immunologic rejection of large animal-derived vessels. However, despite advances in pharmacology, materials science, and device fabrication, these synthetic vascular grafts have not significantly decreased the overall mortality and morbidity (Nugent and Edelman, 2003, Prabhakaran et al., 2017). Synthetic grafts continue to exhibit a number of shortcomings that have limited their impact. These shortcomings include low patency rates for small diameter vessels (< 6 mm in diameter), a lack of growth potential for the pediatric population necessitating repeated interventions, and the susceptibility to infection. In addition to grafting, vascular conduits are also needed for clinical situations such as hemodialysis, which involves large volumes of blood that must be withdrawn and circulated back into a patient several times a week for several hours.

In addition to large-scale vessel complications, ischemic diseases also arise at the microvasculature level (< 1 mm in diameter), where replacing upstream arteries would not address the reperfusion needs of downstream tissues (Hausenloy and Yellon, 2013, Krug et al., 1966). Microvascularization has proven to be a critical step during regeneration and wound healing, where the delay of wound perfusion (in diabetic patients, for example) significantly slows down the formation of the granulation tissue and can lead to severe infection and ulceration (Baltzis et al., 2014, Brem and Tomic-Canic, 2007, Randeria et al., 2015).

In order to design advanced grafts, it is important to take structural components of a blood vessel into consideration, as understanding these elements is required for rational biomaterial design and choosing an appropriate cell source. Many of the different blood vessel beds also share some common structural features. Arteries, veins, and capillaries have a tunica intima comprised of endothelial cells (EC), which regulate coagulation, confer selective permeability, and participate in immune cell trafficking (Herbert and Stainier, 2011, Potente et al., 2011). Arteries and veins are further bound by a second layer, the tunica media, which is composed of smooth muscle cells (SMC), collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, conferring strength to the vessel and acting as effectors of vascular tone. Arterioles and venules, which are smaller caliber equivalents of arteries and veins, are comprised of only a few layers of SMCs, while capillaries, which are the smallest vessels in size, have pericytes abutting the single layer of ECs and basement membrane. Vascular tissue engineering has evolved to generate constructs that incorporate the functionality of these structural layers, withstand physiologic stresses inherent to the cardiovascular system, and promote integration in host tissue without mounting immunologic rejection (Chang and Niklason, 2017).

A suitable cell source is also critical to help impart structural stability and facilitate in vivo integration. Patient-derived autologous cells are one potential cell source that has garnered interest because of their potential to minimize graft rejection. However, isolating and expanding viable primary cells to a therapeutically relevant scale may be limited given that patients with advanced arterial disease likely have cells with reduced growth or regenerative potential. With the advancement of stem cell (SC) technology and gene editing tools such as CRISPR, autologous adult and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are emerging as promising alternative sources of ECs and perivascular SMCs that can be incorporated into the engineered vasculature (Chan et al., 2017, Wang et al., 2017).

Importantly, a viable cell source alone is not sufficient for therapeutic efficacy. Although vascular cells can contribute paracrine factors and have regenerative capacity, merely delivering a dispersed mixture of ECs to the host tissue has shown limited success at forming vasculature or integrating with the host vasculature (Chen et al., 2010). Therefore, recent tissue engineering efforts have instead focused on recreating the architecture and the function of the vasculature in vitro before implantation, with the hypothesis that pre-vascularized grafts and tissues enhance integration with the host. In this review, we explore recent advances in fabricating blood vessels of various calibers, from individual arterial vessels to vascular beds comprised of microvessels, and how these efforts facilitate the integration of the implanted vasculature within a host. We also discuss the extent to which SC-derived ECs and SMCs have been incorporated into these engineered tissues.

Clinical Applications

The first reported successful clinical application of TEBV in patients was performed by Shin’oka et al., who implanted a biodegradable construct as a pulmonary conduit in a child with pulmonary atresia and single ventricle anatomy (Shin’oka et al., 2001). The construct was composed of a synthetic polymer mixture of L-lactide and e-caprolactone, and it was reinforced with PGA and seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). The authors demonstrated patency and patient survival 7 months post-implant, and expanded their study to a series of 23 implanted TEBVs and 19 tissue patch repairs in pediatric patients (Hibino et al., 2010). They were noted to have no graft-related mortality, and four patients required interventions to relieve stenosis at a mean follow-up of 5.8 years. The first sheet-based technology to seed cultured autologous cells, developed by L’Heureux et al., was iterated by the group to induce cultured fibroblast cell sheet over a 10-week maturation period and produce tubules of endogenous ECM over a production time ranging between 6 and 9 months. They dehydrated and provided a living adventitial layer before seeding the constructs with ECs (L’Heureux et al., 2006). Their TEBV, named the Lifeline graft, was implanted in 9 of 10 enrolled patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis and failing access grafts in a clinical trial. Six of the nine surviving patients had patent grafts at 6 months, while the remaining grafts failed due to thrombosis, rejection, and failure (McAllister et al., 2009). An attempt to create an “off the shelf” version of this graft in which pre-fabricated, frozen scaffolds were seeded with autologous endothelium prior to implantation led to 2 of the 3 implanted grafts failing due to stenosis, and one patient passed away due to graft infection (Benrashid et al., 2016).

Most recently, results were reported for the phase II trial of the decellularized engineered vessel Humacyte in end-stage renal disease patients surgically unsuitable for arterio-venous fistula creation (Lawson et al., 2016). This clinical scenario offers a relatively captive patient population in which graft complications are unlikely to be limb or life-threatening, and infectious and thrombotic event rates for traditional materials such as ePTFE are high (Haskal et al., 2010). The manufacturers seeded a 6mm PGA scaffold with SMCs from deceased organ and tissue donors and decellularized the scaffold following ECM production in an incubator coupled with a pulsatile pump prior to implantation. Humacyte demonstrated 63% primary patency at 6 months, 28% at 12 months, and 18% at 18 months post-implant in 60 patients. Ten grafts were abandoned. However, 12-month patency and mean procedure rate of 1.89 per patient-year to restore patency were comparable to PTFE grafts, while higher secondary patency rates were observed (89% versus 55%–65% at 1 year) (Huber et al., 2003, Lok et al., 2013). Although Humacyte revealed no immune sensitization and a lower infection rate than PTFEs (reported up to 12%) (Akoh and Patel, 2010), there remains much work to be done to improve primary patency and reduce the need for interventions.

Harnessing the regenerative functions reported in ECs derived from adult stem cells and iPSCs offers the promise of improving TEBV patency. Mcllhenny et al. generated ECs from adipose-derived stromal cells, transfected them with adenoviral vector carrying the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene, and seeded the ECs onto decellularized human saphenous vein scaffolds (McIlhenny et al., 2015). They hypothesized that through inhibition of platelet aggregation and adhesion molecule expression, nitric oxide synthesis would prevent thrombotic occlusion in TEBV. Indeed, they reported patency with a non-thrombogenic surface 2 months post-implantation in rabbit aortas. While introducing additional complexities, engineering ECs and SMCs with other regenerative, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic genes could perhaps bridge the functional difference between SC-derived cells and native primary cells.

 

CELLLINK 3D Bioprinting Technology

CELLLINK 3D Bioprinting Technology

 

Global Stem Cells Group announces that it will represent CELLINK Bioprinting Technology in Latin America. CELLINK is the world’s first company to market bioinks for 3D bioprinting of human organs and tissue.

MIAMI, Nov. 9, 2017—Global Stem Cells Group (GSCG), a world leader in stem cell and regenerative medicine, announces it will represent CELLLINK 3D Bioprinting Technology in Latin America. CELLINK is the world’s first company biotech company to market bioinks for 3D bioprinting of human organs and tissue.

GSCG will also market CELLINK’S newest product, BIO X printer for researchers, life science companies, and innovators who work with bioprinting on its subsidiary Adimarket.net website.

3D bioprinting of human tissues and organs is a revolutionary technology in the field of tissue engineering. One of the major challenges in stem cell research and tissue engineering is mimicking the micro and macro environment of human tissues. A favorable functional outcome is extremely dependent on the level to which tissue scientist and engineers are able to control the inner micro- and macro-scale features of engineered-tissue. In response to this challenge, advances in additive manufacturing inspired scientists to develop and adapt 3D bioprinting technology for human tissues and organs.

“Our objective is to bring this cutting-edge 3D bioprinting technology to scientists and regenerative medicine researcher throughout Lain America,” says Global Stem Cells Group founder and CEO Benito Novas. “CELLINK has revolutionized tissue engineering with its range of bioprinters, and we’re excited to make this process available to scientists and regenerative medicine researchers in Mexico, Central America, and South America.

“This opportunity is ideally suited to Global Stem Cells’ commitment to advancing the benefits of stem cell medicine in Latin America and worldwide, Novas says.”

To learn more about Global Stem Cells Group, visit the GSCG website,  email info@stemcellsgroup.com, or call +1305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cells Group:

Global Stem Cells Group (GSCG) Global Stem Cells Group (GSCG) is a worldwide network that combines seven major medical corporations, each focused on furthering scientific and technological advancements to lead cutting-edge stem cell development, treatments, and training. The united efforts of GSCG’s affiliate companies provide medical practitioners with a one-stop hub for stem cell solutions that adhere to the highest medical standards.

Global stem cell’s mission is to be the largest recognized stem cell and regenerative medicine network in the world.

About AdiMarket:

Adimarket, Inc., a division of the Global Stem Cells Group, is a one-stop, cost-competitive online marketplace for quality regenerative medicine equipment and supplies for physicians and health care professionals.

Adimarket was founded to provide practitioners the tools they need to practice regenerative medicine in a medical office setting. Motivated by a firm belief in the impact stem cell medicine can have when dispensed in a doctor’s office, Adimarket provides physicians with the tools they need to provide patients with cutting-edge treatments.

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CELLLINK 3D bioprinting technology