stem cells, stem cell research, Santiago symposium

Molecular biologist, immunologist and researcher Duncan Ross, Ph.D., founder of Kimera Labs, has joined the Global Stem Cells Group Advisory Board faculty.

Global Stem Cells Group CEO Benito Novas announced that Duncan Ross, Ph.D. has joined the GSCG Advisory Board.GSCG2 Ross is the founder of GSCG affiliate Kimera Labs in Miami.

In 2004, Ross received his Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of Miami, where he studied hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders and the suppression of graft vs. host disease (GVHD) under UM Professor Robert Levy Ph.D. Ross was motivated to study in this field after witnessing his father’s experience suffering through unsuccessful treatments for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Since launching his career in 2004, Ross has investigated various methods of immune suppression, from regulatory T cells to post transplant cyclophosphamide, in collaboration with the Leo Luznik Transplant Lab at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. The collaboration led to multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, including “Blood” and “Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation 1,2.”

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 8.20.17 PMRoss’s interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for immune suppression stemmed from this work and the work of others in the use of MSCs to treat GVHD.

In 2008, Ross founded Kimera Labs in Miami, currently focused on the use of MSCs for the suppression of various immune mediated pathologies and regenerative medicine in the US, Latin America, and the Bahamas.

Ross recently obtained Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval to perform a patient sponsored clinical trial for chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) using mesenchymal stem cells purified from fat, through the Kimera Society. Kimera Labs in association with Global Stem Cells Group plans to apply the same approach to diabetes and other autoimmune diseases.

Ross joins a group of esteemed stem cell researchers and physicians on the Global Stem Cells Group Advisory Board, who contribute their expertise and provide strategic advice for the management of the international biotech company.

To learn more, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website, email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, Or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cell Group:

Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.
Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

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stem cells, stem cell symposium, Santiago biotech lab

Global Stem Cells Group and the University of Santiago, Chile have endorsed an Asian-Pacific alliance for a regenerative medicine and stem cell symposium July 1-2 at the university’s Santiago campus and other stem cell protocol management initiatives. Through the alliance, the two organizations established a working agenda for collaborative initiatives in stem cell and regenerative medicine research and development for 2016 – 2020.

Global Stem Cells Group and the University of Santiago Biotechnology Lab have announced a mutual endorsement of an Asia-Pacific Symposium as other research and development initiatives for potential stem cell protocol management for 2016 – 2020.

GSCG2In 2015, University of Santiago officials and top Global Stem Cells Group executives began meeting to establish a working agenda and foster initiatives to promote stem cell research and development as a collaborative effort.

Professor Alejandra Moenen, Ph.D., who heads the University of Santiago’s Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, and a team of Ph.D.s from the university will join Global Stem Cells Group for their first joint venture, an Asia-Pacific Symposium on stem cell and regenerative medicine July 1-2, 2016. Moenen is an internationally prominent researcher whose work in biological research has been published in 50 major scientific journals worldwide.

The symposium will focus on regenerative medicine and stem cell applications to anti-aging and aesthetic medicine. University of Santiago faculty will lead the symposium, which will host qualified academic and medical groups from around the world who will present their scientific papers.

Global Stem Cells Group and the University of Santiago’s Biotechnology Department decided to join forces and create a collaborative agenda based on the synergy between the two organizations.

“Chile is a country where we have first world science, without being part of developed countries,” says Moenen. “Today biotechnology labwe are proud to start an alliance through which we can work hand in hand with Global Stem Cells Group and its international network, which has been able to harness science to improve the quality of life for people. “

Enrique Testart, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of Global Stem Cells Group, says he was honored to learn that a Chilean

University had initiated this new approach to collaborating with GSCG, which he believes will offer unparalleled opportunities for exchange, relationships with other institutions, and all the technology that Global Stem Cells Group can offer for studies and analysis in the area of regenerative medicine.

“A range of criteria and this innovative university are what stand out in this framework agreement,” Testart says. “It places us above any attempt to trivialize the issue.

stem cells, stem cell research, stem cells Santiago Chile

Enrique Testart, M.D.

“Stem cells are not a fad, there are those who have been working for two decades in this field, and therefore the union between this esteemed university and this young and talented biotech company is good news for the country, for the world and for science—everyone should applaud.”

A meeting to confirm the Asia-Pacific Symposium alliance was attended by Kevin Maisey, Ph.D., and Jorge LaPorte, Ph.D., both representing the Biology and Biochemistry Department of the University of Santiago. University Dean Silvia Ferrada Vergara has validated the agreement, which will be announces at the Asia-Pacific Conference in July.

For more information, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website, email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cell Group:

Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.

Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

About the University of Santiago:

Celebrating the 166th anniversary of its founding in 2016, the University of Santiago is one of the oldest and most traditional institutions of higher education in Chile. Offering 66 comprehensive undergraduate programs to more than 18,000 students, the university has seven faculties representing departments of Engineering, Humanities, Science, Business and Economics, Chemistry and Biology, Medical Sciences and Technology. The university us moving toward a new era of implementing improved and advanced master’s degree and doctoral degree programs, in addition to the numerous courses and postgraduate programs already in place in a variety of academic and research disciplines.

Since Chile’s 1981 higher education reform, the University of Santiago has concentrated its activities in the metropolitan area, with a particular focus on teaching, research and extension, carried out on the 34-hectare (84 acre) campus in the City of Santiago.

The University of Santiago is known for its participation in national and international projects and the contributions of its scholars to various fields of knowledge. A singular effort has been placed on linking the work of university researchers, who have a close relationship with the socio-economic needs of the country, to improve public health conditions in the country. The University of Santiago is one of Chile’s four Universities noted for successful fundraising efforts to support research and development.

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stem cells, stem cell research, Santiago Chile symposium

Global Stem Cells Group Advisory Board member Duncan Ross, Ph.D., founder of Kimera Research Labs, will be the keynote speaker at the Global Stem Cells Group Symposium in Santiago, Chile July 1-2, 2016.

GSCG2MIAMI, April 26, 2016–Global Stem Cells Group has announced that affiliate Kimera Research Labs founder Duncan Ross, Ph.D., a GSCG Advisory Board member, will be the keynote speaker at the Asia-Pacific Symposium in Santiago Chile, July 1-2, 2016. The abstract for Ross’s lecture will be, “The mechanism of action of stem cells in regenerative medicine is increasingly being understood to be effected through paracrine factors. Central to the question of when and how to treat an individual disease is where and for what duration a transplanted cell will persist to generate these factors.”

In the absence of a robust ability to track cell persistence in humans, Dr. Ross will present current research in murine hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation with support from human transplant results.

stem cells, stem cell research, Santiago symposium

Duncan Ross, Ph.D.

The symposium will be co-sponsored by Global Stem Cells Group and the University of Santiago’s Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, and will focus on regenerative medicine and stem cell applications to anti-aging and aesthetic medicine. University of Santiago faculty will lead the symposium, which will host qualified academic and medical groups from around the world who will present their scientific papers.

The symposium is the first joint endeavor between Global Stem Cells Group and the University of Santiago since establishing an alliance recently, and which will be announced at the Asia-Pacific Symposium. It also marks Ross’s first appearance as a member of the Global Stem Cells Group Advisory Board.

Ross received a Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of Miami and specializes in research, mesenchymal stem cell applications, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders, the suppression of graft vs. host disease, and var
ious methods of immune suppression.

Global Stem Cells Group and Kimera Labs share a commitment to research and development, and providing stem cell treatments to patients in clinical settings worldwide.stem cells, Santiago University, regenerative medicine

To learn more, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website, email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cell Group:

Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.

Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

About Kimera Labs:

Kimera Labs is currently focused on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the suppression of various immune mediated pathologies and regenerative medicine in the US, Latin America, and the Bahamas. Founder Duncan Ross, Ph.D., is an immunologist and researcher who has studied hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders, the suppression of graft vs. host disease, and various methods of immune suppression.

Kimera Labs provides patients access to stem cell treatment in the U.S. according to U.S. laws. In order to provide the greatest benefit to patients, Ross frequently travels to treat patients in Central and South America where specialists are available in a different regulatory environment.

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Global Stem Cells Group and Kimera Research Labs have announced an alliance to conduct scientific research on highly manipulated cells and culture expansion, and cryopreservation of autologous stem cells.

MIAMI, April 26, 2016–Global Stem Cells Group and Kimera Research Labs have announced an alliance to conduct GSCG2scientific research on highly manipulated stem cells and culture expansion, and cryopreservation of autologous stem cells. The collaboration will open new opportunities for GSCG to increase its participation in scientific research and development of new stem cell protocols and treatments for a number of conditions.

The manipulation of stem cells involves the ability to deliver molecules into adherent cells without disrupting differentiation, a process biotechnology researchers need in order to advance both fundamental knowledge and the state-of-the-art in stem cell research. Differentiation is the process by which an unspecialized cell, such as a stem cell, becomes specialized into one of the many cells in the body. During differentiation, certain genes become activated and other genes become inactivated in an painstakingly regulated manner. As a result, a differentiated cell develops specific structures and performs certain functions that ultimately allows it to replace damaged or dead cells. In the laboratory, a stem cell can be manipulated to become specialized or partially specialized cell types, such as heart muscle, nerve, or pancreatic cells.

“Non-destructive manipulation of stem cells in the correct environment is key to enabling technology needed within the biology and medical research communities,” says Benito Novas, CEO of Global Stem Cells Group. “To realize the promise of stem cell-based therapies to treat injuries and diseases, scientists must be able to manipulate stem cells so that they possess the necessary characteristics for successful differentiation, transplantation, and engraftment.”

To bring successful new treatments to the clinic, scientists need to control certain steps for stem cells to be useful for transplant purposes. Researchers are constantly discovering new ways to manipulate stem cells to be reproducibly made to:

  •     Replicate extensively and generate sufficient quantities of cells for making tissue.
  •     Differentiate into the desired cell type(s).
  •     Survive in the recipient after transplant.
  •     Integrate into the surrounding tissue after transplant.
  •     Function appropriately for the duration of the recipient’s life.
  •     Avoid harming the recipient in any way.

Scientists are also experimenting with different research strategies to generate tissue without the concern of immune rejection.

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 8.20.17 PMResearch on cryopreservation of autologous stem cells is necessary for cell bank procedures in which stem cell expansion and use are not immediately needed. Cryopreservation allows for the long-term storage of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and is the preferred storage technique for virtually all components intended for autologous HSC transplantation.

Cryopreservation allows the administration of multiple-day transplant conditioning regimens as well as elective storage for patients to receive transplants at a subsequent point in a course of treatment, and offers patients the opportunity to benefit from multidose protocols.

Global Stem Cells Group and Kimera Labs share a commitment to research, develop and provide stem cell treatments to patients worldwide in a clinical setting.

To learn more, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website, email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cell Group:
Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.

Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

About Kimera Labs:
Kimera Labs is currently focused on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the suppression of various immune mediated pathologies and regenerative medicine in the US, Latin America, and the Bahamas. Founder Duncan Ross, Ph.D., is an immunologist and researcher who has studied hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders, the suppression of graft vs. host disease, and various methods of immune suppression.

Kimera Labs provides patients access to stem cell treatment in the U.S. according to U.S. laws. In order to provide the greatest benefit to patients, Ross frequently travels to treat patients in Central and South America where specialists are available in a different regulatory environment.

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Stem Cells Repair Skull, Face Bones

Scientists may be one step closer to a breakthrough that uses stem cells to replace damaged skull and facial bones in patients who experience a head trauma or undergo cancer surgery requiring repair and reconstructive surgery.

Researchers have discovered and isolated stem cells capable of repairing these bones in mice. The research, led by Takamitsu Maruyama and the research team at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y., could also help patients born with a skull deformity known as craniosynostosis, which can lead to developmental delays and pressure on the brain.

stem cells facial boneIn the study, scientists investigated the role of the Axin2 gene in bone formation and regeneration. They also examined a specific mutation that causes craniosynostosis in mice. Their finding show that stem cells involved in skull formation are contained within this cell population. These cells are specificto the bones in the head and are very different from other stem cells involved in the formation of the bones in the legs and other parts of the body.

Tests to uncover these cells could also help physicians detect bone diseases caused by stem cell abnormalities, according to the researchers.

The research was published Feb. 1 in the journal Nature Communications.

3D retina organoids

Medical breakthroughs using stem cells are aimed at all parts of the body bones, kidneys, joints, spines–and now, sight.

A German study in March in Stem Cell Reports, reports that scientists have created an efficient way of developing 3D retina organoids leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies.

3-D Mini-retinas protocol

The new mini-retina protocol involves cutting an organoid grown from stem cells into three, half-moon shaped pieces at an early stage of eye development. Each of these pieces eventually grows into the full suite of cells found in the retina.

3-D retinal organoids developed in this process efficiently replicate retina formation. This includes the light-detectingATAGLANCE cone cells, which now can be produced in high quantities.

Cone photoreceptors, which are responsible for high acuity and color vision, are the most precious retinal cell type with regard to potential future cell replacement therapies in patients affected by retinal degeneration caused by diabetes and inherited disorders.

The process of developing 3D retinal organoids also allows the surviving organoids to grow to reach sizes similar to uncut organoids. These mini-retinas swim around in the dish and because they’re not attached to a surface, better reflect the structure of retinal tissue during development.

In the past, the inability to produce such cells has been a major limitation for regenerative medicine; however, this new method increases the yield of retinal organoids 4-fold, allowing researchers to take a great step forward in the study of the retina and how to repair it.

3-D Mini-retinas offer more diverse ways to study retina tissue

3-D mini-retinals stem cells“The goal isn’t just to make the closest thing next to a real retina, but also to possibly harness the flexibility of the system to create more diverse ways of studying retina tissue,” says senior author Mike Karl, of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and part of the Center for Regenerative Therapies (CRTD) at Technische Universität Dresden.

“Even with our new additions to existing organoid systems, we have not yet reached that tipping point of robustness that we need for people without the expertise to grow these models.”

Karl and his colleagues’ comparative studies on pluripotent stem cell-derived human and mouse retina organoids and mouse retina in vivo support the power of the new organoid protocol.

New insights in the study of retinal disease

“Tissue heterogeneity (diversity) is a major challenge in organoid systems, and here our work provides new insight, which will help to develop specific organoid-based models, specifically to reliably study retinal disease mechanism,” says Karl.

The Karl Lab’s change to the mini-retina protocol involves cutting a retina organoid grown from stem cells into three pieces at an early stage of eye development. Each of these pieces, which look like little half moons, eventually grows into the full suite of cells found in the retina, thereby increasing the yield of retinal organoids up to 4-fold compared to previous protocols. Karl’s next objective is to make his 3-D “mini-retinas” even more complex, perhaps by bringing in blood vessels and using the organoids to study regeneration and the function of different neural cell types–specifically, from the human retina.

 

 

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) recently reported that stem cell transplant treatments normally used for cancer patients are helping Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients in the UK. According to the January 18, 2016 report, 20 patients received bone marrow stem cell transplants using their own stem cells, and that at least some of the patients who were paralyzed by MS are able to walk again post-treatment.

Approximately100,000 people in the United Kingdom suffer from MS, with most new patients diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 30 years of age.

“To have a treatment which can potentially reverse disability is really a major achievement,” says Prof Basil Sharrack, of Sheffield’s Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, England.

The treatment, known as autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), involves the intravenous infusion of autologous or allogeneic stem cells harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow to reestablish hematopoietic function (formation of blood or blood cells) in patients whose bone marrow or immune system is damaged or defective by chemotherapy. Using stem cells harvested from the patient’s bone marrow helps rebuild the immune system. The theory is that these newly harvested cells are at such an early stage in development that the cellular defects that result in MS do not exist.

“The immune system is being reset or rebooted back to a time point before it caused MS,” says Prof John Snowden, consultant hematologist at Royal Hallamshire Hospital.

The BBC’s Panorama program spoke to several MS patients who have undergone the stem cell transplant.

Steven Storey was diagnosed with MS in 2013 and, within a year, went from being an able-bodied athlete to wheelchair dependent and losing sensation in much of his body.

“I went from running marathons to needing 24-hour acute care. At one point I couldn’t even hold a spoon and feed myself,” Storey says.MS clinical trials

Within a few days of the transplant Storey was able to move his toes, and after four months he could stand unaided.

While Storey still needs a wheelchair for mobility, he calls his progress astounding.

“It’s been incredible,” he says. “I was in a dire place, but now I can swim and cycle and I am determined to walk.”

The Royal Hallamshire Hospital along with hospitals in the United States, Sweden and Brazil, is part of an international clinical trial called MIST that is assessing the long-term benefits of the stem cell procedure on MS patients. Study participants all have relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), and received intensive chemotherapy to completely destroy the patients’ immune systems.

Treatment costs are about the same as the annual cost for existing treatments, and the stem cell treatment does not require the use of new or existing medications.

Prof Richard Burt of Northwestern University in Chicago carried out the first hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for MS in 1995, and is coordinating this current MIST international trial, which began in 2006.

“There has been resistance to this in the pharma and academic world,” Burt says. “This is not a technology you can patent and we have achieved this without industry backing.”

A study published last year involving MS patients in Chicago showed significant reductions in neurological disability, and for some the improvements persisted for at least four years, although there was no comparative control group.

The outcomes of the current international trial will be reported in 2018, and may determine whether the stem cell transplant becomes a standard in the United Kingdoms health care system for many MS patients.

“Ongoing research suggests stem cell treatments such as HSCT could offer hope, and it’s clear that in the cases highlighted by Panorama they’ve had a life-changing impact,” says Emma Gray, M.D., head of clinical trials at UK’s MS Society.

 

Global Stem Cells Group has announced plans to hold clinical trials, pending IRB approval, for bone marrow stem cell treatments targeting knee osteoarthritis. The trials will be held in five GSCG facilities in the U.S. and South America, with 25 patients accepted for each location.

MIAMI, March 31, 2016—Pending Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. has announced plans to conduct a multi-center, placebo controlled clinical trial to measure the safety and effectiveness of the intra-articular application of freshly isolated bone marrow stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.GSCG2

The clinical trials, which will begin July 1, 2016 and run for one year, will be held in Global Stem Cell Group facilities in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Bogota, Colombia; Quito, Ecuador; Miami, Florida and Topeka, Kansas. Each center will accept 25 patients per clinical trial, and patients will receive a bone marrow stem cell injection in one knee and a placebo in the other knee..

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 7.04.59 PMThe trials are designed to investigate the possible beneficial effect of freshly harvested bone marrow stem cell applications on knee osteoarthritis patients in the control group. Patients will receive standard treatment of bone marrow stem cells intravenously, and will be monitored and assessed for any changes in clinical condition.

Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, progressive condition affecting an increasing number of people, especially the elderly and obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage—the natural cushioning between joints inside the knee.

The condition is the result of the wearing away of cartilage. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits of cartilage, resulting in pain, swelling, stiffness and a decreased ability to move.

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 7.53.57 PMAccording to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), knee osteoarthritis will affect 67 million people in the United States by 2030. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, total knee replacement is the closest treatment available for permanent relief, which requires invasive surgery, comes at a high cost and is not always successful. The latest advances in stem cell therapies for knee osteoarthritis are designed to restore cartilage function in the knee.

Global Stem Cells Group offers the most advanced protocols and techniques in cellular medicine from around the world.

Details of the protocol and eligibility criteria will be released upon IRB approval.

For more information on Global Stems Cell Group, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website, email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cells Group:

Global Stem Cells Group, Inc, is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.

Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

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Global Stem Cells Group has begun the manufacturing phase of Progenikine™, a new SVF closed system kit utilizing EmCyte technology, containing all the elements necessary to process adipose tissue and obtain stromal vascular fraction in a sterile environment.

MIAMI, March 31, 2016—Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. has announced that Progenikine™, its new and approved SVF closed system kit using EmCyte technology, is in the manufacturing phase and will be available to physicians in July 2016. The Progenikine kit contains all the elements necessary to process adipose tissue and obtain stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in a closed environment.

Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are used by physicians for a variety of indications. Most commonly, ASCs are GSCG2isolated at the point of care from lipoaspirate (derived from liposuction) tissue as the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), harvested from the patient and immediately administered to the patient as an injection, or used to enrich fat grafts. Isolation of ASCs from adipose tissue is a relatively simple process performed routinely in cell biology laboratories, but isolation at the point of care for immediate clinical administration requires special methodology to prevent contamination, ensure integrity of the clinical procedure, and comply with regulatory requirements.

Developed in conjunction with Patrick Pennie, Emcyte CEO, and and Maritza Novas Director of Research and Development for Global Stem Cells Group, Progenikine emcyte logofuses elements from Emcyte systems with the Global Stem cells Group SVF protocols.The kit can provide a low cost, rapid and simple alternative to traditional methods of isolating ASCs, particularly when smaller quantities are needed.

“The Progenikine kit is the newest product designed to help Global Stem Cells Group’s mission to provide accessible products to our member clients, ensuring that more patients will be able to gain access to stem cell therapies,” says Benito Novas, GSCG CEO.

For more information on Global Stems Cell Group, visit the Global Stem Cells Group website,email bnovas(at)stemcellsgroup(dot)com, or call +1 305 560 5337.

About Global Stem Cells Group:

Global Stem Cells Group, Inc. is the parent company of six wholly owned operating companies dedicated entirely to stem cell research, training, products and solutions. Founded in 2012, the company combines dedicated researchers, physician and patient educators and solution providers with the shared goal of meeting the growing worldwide need for leading edge stem cell treatments and solutions. With a singular focus on this exciting new area of medical research, Global Stem Cells Group and its subsidiaries are uniquely positioned to become global leaders in cellular medicine.

Global Stem Cells Group’s corporate mission is to make the promise of stem cell medicine a reality for patients around the world. With each of GSCG’s six operating companies focused on a separate research-based mission, the result is a global network of state-of-the-art stem cell treatments.

About Emcyte:

Fort Myers, Florida-based EmCyte Corporation is a leader in autologous cellular biologics with the GenesisCS Component Concentrating Systems. These systems provide patients with the best opportunity for rapid recovery and provide practitioners with the most advanced clinical point of care experience. EmCyte systems are developed to meet every clinical requirement, giving the physician better clinical choices. EmCyte devices have been independently reviewed and show to produce buffycoat concentrations of 6x to greater than 10x baseline in 7mLs, with yields ranging from 70 percent to greater than 90 percent

EmCyte technology allows for the safe extraction of concentrated platelets and other regenerative cell types from the patient’s own blood. These cells are then re-suspended in a small volume of the patient’s blood plasma and then applied to the treatment site.

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MSCs, Osteoporosis, Mesenchymal stem cells

Researchers from the University of Toronto and The Ottawa Hospital were looking to see if mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) might treat osteoporosis. MSCs are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including: bone cells (osteoblasts), cartilage cells (chondrocytes), muscle cells (myocytes) and fat cells (adipocytes).

Faulty MSCs are the culprits behind osteoporosis; after injecting healthy MSCs into mice with the affliction that causes bones to become weak and brittle, researchers were hoping for a general increase in the mice’s bone health. Instead, they were surprised (and probably very excited) to discover after six months—a quarter of a mouse’s life span—that healthy, functioning bone had replaced the damaged osteoporotic bone. The bone structure in the little creatures, which had been severely compromised by osteoporosis, had been restored to a normal, healthy state! The healthy mesenchymal stem cells did what they were born to do. They became bone cells and went to work, much like the restoration of an old building at the hands of architects and laborers, only without the scaffolds and noise. MSCs work very quietly.

Researchers are hoping that these findings could lead to a new way of treating osteoporosis in humans, or even delay its onset indefinitely.

Stem cell researchers have known for some time that MSCs can boost the regeneration of bone, and in fact a test group of elderly patients in the U.S. who suffer from osteoporosis have already received MSC injections as part of an ancillary trial. The research team is preparing to to examine their blood samples to see if biological markers indicate an improvement in bone growth and bone reabsorption.osteoprosis, stem cells, MSCs

Depending on the outcome of those blood tests, larger trials involving human patients could follow within the next 5 years.

In addition to working quietly and therefore not waking you to the sound of a jackhammer at 7 a.m., there are other cool qualities to MSCs. For instance, they are “a heterogeneous population of musculoskeletal progenitors (another name for adult stem cells) that includes skeletal stem cells (SSCs).” An added perk is that they can be transplanted between individuals without the need to be matched, and without the risk of rejection.

MSCs are awesome.

Globally, more than 200 million people are living with either postmenopausal osteoporosis—known as type 1 osteoporosis, which affects mainly women, or age-related type 2 osteoporosis, which affects both men and women.

With type 2 osteoBone marrow stem cells, osteoporosis, MSCs, Mesenchymal stem cellsporosis, there is a reduction in the inner structure of the bone. The bone becomes thinner and less dense, and it can no longer function properly.

Worldwide, type 2 osteoporosis leads to around 8.9 million bone fractures annually. Hip fractures are among the most common fractures related to osteoporosis, which can lead to disability and even death in elderly patients.

Currently, Teriparatide (brand name Fortéo) is the only drug available to treat type 2 osteoporosis, and its effectiveness lasts for only two years.

The senior author of the study, titled Systemic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation Prevents Functional Bone Loss in a Mouse Model of Age-Related Osteoporosis, and published March 17, 2016, is William Stanford, Ph.D., a senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and a professor at the University of Ottawa. Previous research led Stanford to discover the association between defects in MSC and age-related osteoporosis in mice.

The study’s co-author, John E. Davies, Ph.D., D.Sc., is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, The study’s findings are published in the current issue of Stem Cells Translational Medicine.